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Dependency Amongst Medical Professionals

Drug Abuse In Health Care


Medical professionals have the same level of risk of drug and alcohol abuse as other people. The addiction can lead to several negative effects for the professionals within the medical fraternity and their patients at the same time. You may not expect it but addiction occurs in many health care employees. Just like usual cases of addiction, there can be numerous causes why healthcare people turn to substance abuse. Some might take drugs to cope up with long-hour shifts or night shifts, some to escape from occupational stress, and some for other reasons.


Oxycodone and Fentanyl are the most abused drugs by over 100,000 medical practitioners and this is according to the UK Today newspaper.


Doctors and nurses can be considered slightly different from other professionals because of their easy accessibility to some of the popular sought-after drugs because it is easier for them to lay their hands on the drugs and to create or feed an addiction.

Medical workers have bigger chances of getting healed from their illness once addicted; even though they equally have great chances of developing an obsession for drugs.


Drug Dependence Symptoms Among Medical Professionals

Doctors and nurses have been considered as highly functional addicts, and therefore, it can be difficult to recognise signs of dependence upon a drug or alcohol. They are found to be good at maintaining status quo despite their addiction.

We invite you to get in touch with us on 0800 246 1509 to find a suitable treatment program if you are a medical professional struggling with alcohol or drug addiction.


Physicians General Abuse Symptoms

  • Often shifting their careers.
  • Preferring to work during the night when there is a lack of supervision and access to prohibited substances is easy.
  • Dozing off during working hours.
  • Interested in taking shift to monitor the patient's' narcotics use.
  • They are somewhat uncomfortable when performing a long duty.
  • Taking frequent breaks to the bathroom or remaining absent without explanations.
  • Trying so much to cover their smell which is always that of alcohol or drugs.
  • Extreme financial, relationship or family stress.
  • Glassy eyes.
  • Other Physicians in charge of drugs are always their good friends.
  • Lack of focus in their work.

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Reasons Behind The Rate Of Drug And Alcohol Dependency In The Medical Industry

Substance abuse among medical personnel may be attributed to a number of distinct characteristics of a doctor's or nurse's work. One common reason that has been noticed among medical professionals is the temptation to use substance such as oxycodone and fentanyl because of the easy access they have to these powerful substances. They can decide to practice the feelings/vibration that follows addiction just to hype their satisfaction, because they are aware of how the substance manifests on a person.


Long working hours, high occupational stress, and the need to stay alert are some of the other top reasons why medical professionals abuse drugs. Instances of regrettable and depressing situations where they may blame themselves fully or partially about it also contributes to their substance abuse.


Occupational Signs Of Abuse

Doctors or nurses who are currently suffering addiction are more susceptible to errors and oversight. Their lack of focus or instability when it comes to priority greatly impacts their performance.

The patients that are being attended to by these medical practitioners have their lives at risks. These cravings are easily curbed during the early stage of the illness, although it's always difficult for doctors to admit they are under drug dependence. There is a high chance their professionalism will be affected if they stay addicted to the use of the drugs or alcohol.


Statistics Of Abuse Amongst Medical Professionals

Anyone, including doctors, nurses, and other medical professionals can fall into addiction. The good news is, doctor and nurses have treatment scheme specially meant for their recovery.

Numerous treatment facilities catering to the wellness of the addicted healthcare professionals are now easily accessible nationwide. These programs have been developed to provide the help and guidance needed by medical professionals through their recovery and to provide methods that can help to avoid the triggers after they are back within their workplace.

Their treatment and recovery process usually entails many things such as:

  • How to restore your career and reputation.
  • The procedures of resuming duty as a specialist.
  • Addressing matters regarding discipline and licensing.
  • Managing triggers in and out of work.
  • Engaging with monitoring programs.
  • Commitment post-rehab care.

Medical professionals can definitely remain optimistic of their recovery because they are contributing to a higher average among addicts within the subject of maintaining sobriety after treatment. The level of expertise and experience of therapy personnel are also among the contributing factors in the high recovery rate of doctors and nurses undergoing treatment. They provide a more personalized and well-targeted care to address the very reason of the abuse thereby effectively guiding the patient.