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6 Signs Indicating You've Lost Control of Your Addiction

6 Signs Indicating You've Lost Control of Your Addiction

What are the signs that show you've lost control of your addiction? Managing a habit can be one of the most difficult things anyone could ever undergo.

I went through a phase of unending apprehension, desolation and mental disturbance; during this phase, I felt tortured but then my breakthrough came, I got back on my feet and became the captain of my ship. It felt like the end of the world to me, there was nothing bigger than the worries of myself.


When I commenced utilizing I felt like all of my fears were left on hold.


The greater part of my apprehensions and issues all of a sudden blended and vanished all through that mind-boggling sentiment fake satisfaction and bliss that at last prompt to my breaking point.

One of the most difficult phases of my dependence were the first few months before really going into therapy. Not having the capacity to recognize I had an issue was what took control of my consistently and made me delve like a maniac in my own mind searching for reasons and motivations to legitimize my disposition, until I at last acknowledged it had taken away all that I thought about, everybody I ever adored and each fantasy I ever had.


Here Are 6 Signs That Opened My Eyes To Give Me A Chance To Perceive How I Lost Control Of My Life

  • Everyday feels just the same, no joy, only darkness.

Regardless of the quantity of the substance I took, my addiction made me feel disillusioned about life in general. The stressful times made me stuck, it was like holding my body back and telling me to stay on the wrong path. My situation appeared hopeless while my lamentations were only equalled by the feeling of being let-down which my family felt because of me. Then, all I felt were guilt and frustration getting into me, I pictured my beloved family and friends were disappointed by me I almost could not forgive myself. It resembled life's just mission was to help me to remember what number of oversights I had made and the amount I was harming everybody around me. It was a never stopping system where dejection and anxiety passed the ball onto one an tither's court and my only path out was to heighten the amount I was utilizing. Apparently, by utilizing more and more often, the spiral of self-destruction I was entangled in took its baddest and massive turn and enabled me feel I was attaining a point of no comeback. At this stage, the uneasiness and the despair in life turned out to be such a weight, to the point that despite the fact that I was utilizing to get away, it was just pushing me harder into my enslavement.

  • All you care about disappears until you lose it

Some of the people I had close to me during my time as a stoner were present to support me till the very end, and for this, I'm so grateful. Many others couldn't withstand it any longer and left for good because they could simply not comprehend how much my dependence functioned. Nevertheless, because of how profound into my issues and issues I was, I began to push away even the ones that needed to stick around to receive me in return. It was like my addiction had hands that closed my eyes to see the reality. I began to report sick my workplace because I have no desire to go. I avoid meeting people I loved because I could not imagine myself without using for a long time, it tied me down. The only thing which made my life seem meaningful was the one thing which caused my disillusion such that everything I held dearly vanished.

  • You lose charge of your everyday

Self-control was never my most powerful suit. I had repeatedly lied to myself that I would quit drugs every time I took drugs. Each of those moments lead to me believing how it would be well to just apply a small portion more as a "goodbye" to the substances. My body and soul were controlled by the guilt and frustration, leaving me unable to interact with people like I used to because the guilty I felt. I hid in my room all the time, disregarding every other duty. When bills arrived they began to accumulate on the table. Sometimes the phone would not cease to ring as everyone knew there were issues in my life which I'm battling with; I just didn't want to admit to them that they were right. I felt like I no longer have power over anything. Not even the time, place or even the quantity I took.

  • You use lies as shields for your problems

This was possibly the thing that caused matters tougher than what they could've been. Besides guilt, there was something got inside me, that is fear of being rejected by people around me that pushed me to lie. I lied to cover up my bad addiction and it gave me hard times to cope with. I was taking money from friends and family, never being able to return it. Addiction was destroying my life in numerous ways, monetarily, emotionally and biologically. I was manhandling my body. I quit eating, quit dealing with myself, began shedding pounds at a disturbing rate; everybody knew I was having issues and they all needed to help, however misleading them and myself simply developed a divider amongst them and me. I did not realize that I was also lying to my suffering self. I told myself quite a few stories, arguments and excuses to continue usage that I think I could've written a book on lame reasons to misuse substances.

  • You pursue motivating high to stay away from withdrawal

Withdrawal is one of the baddest things a dependent can undergo. Depression, frustration and other negative feelings are something that everyone do not want to keep, for an addict, those are more like feelings to avoid. Getting high while using is a feeling that can replace those negative feelings, so I did it to avoid being depressed. There is this desire to take more drugs as an escape route due to the level of tension within you. And as a result to the reality that the more I utilized the more tolerance I created, it turned out more bad within time.

  • You care about nothing else

After all the exemptions were said. Every one of the ties with friends and family were cut by me. I was so into drugs and that euphoric feeling that I had little thought for anything else and finally my nightmares came to reality. I told everyone who wanted to help me to go away and that they could not save me, but some people who really cared about me and understood my addiction waited for the right time to reach and help me. I was totally blinded by my habit that virtually nothing else is significant. So I lost my job, and my co-workers stopped trying to come across, many of my loved ones gradually got over my situation and moved on.


By now everything the people close to me told began to get to me. When I thought everything was lost, when I trusted that I had wound up in a sorry situation, I understood I required help and there were sufficient around to help me move out of that dull and profound well I had fallen into.


My involvement in drugs can be regarded as one of the difficult phases of my life and is the toughest things my loved ones have ever faced. I think things could've been somehow simpler on every person if we all understood a bit more concerning what dependence implies not only to the dependent but as well to the family. While I was blinded by the addiction, the people that cared about me consistently waited outside the well to save me because they identified these signs before me.

I was saved by my loving and patient family and friends.


I thought everything was lost however at last, I experienced a recuperation procedure that opened my eyes to another upbeat solid life, where I haven't overlooked my past yet I pardoned myself for what I did and requested absolution without disgrace. It was not easy, I won't deceive you, but I'm so glad that I wasn't unaccompanied and that I still have people who have confidence in me until I recovered.

Identifying these signs can bring a significant change into the life of a user, allowing them to understand that you still care irrespective of how sore things may turn out can be what will eventually light up the path to sobriety.